M. BUTTERFLY Back on Broadway: A Conversation with David Henry Hwang and Julie Taymor at Asia Society on November 3

David Henry Hwang and Julie Taymor in front of the Cort Theatre on the opening night of M. BUTTERFLY on October 26, 2017. Photo by Lia Chang

On Friday, November 3, 2017, Asia Society is presenting A Conversation with Tony Award-winning playwright David Henry Hwang and director Julie Taymor at Asia Society, 725 Park Avenue, New York, NY from 6:30pm – 8:00pm. $20 members; $22 students/seniors; $25 nonmembers BUY TICKETS »

David Henry Hwang and Julie Taymor in front of the Cort Theatre on the opening night of M. BUTTERFLY on October 26, 2017. Photo by Lia Chang
David Henry Hwang and Julie Taymor in front of the Cort Theatre on the opening night of M. BUTTERFLY on October 26, 2017. Photo by Lia Chang

The revival of Hwang’s Tony Award-winning play M. Butterfly  opened on October 26th at the Cort Theatre starring Academy Award nominee Clive Owen and Jin Ha, helmed by the visionary Julie Taymor (The Lion King). Based on real-life scandal, M. Butterfly delves into a world of love, espionage, and deception. David Henry Hwang and Julie Taymor come together to discuss their artistic collaboration and the new vision they have developed in recognition of the wider issues that make the production contemporary, nearly 30 years after its original Broadway debut in 1988.

David Henry Hwang, Jin Ha, Julie Taymor and Clive Owen at the M. BUTTERFLY opening night party at the Red Eye Grill in New York on October 26, 2017. Photo by Lia Chang
David Henry Hwang, Jin Ha, Julie Taymor and Clive Owen at the M. BUTTERFLY opening night party at the Red Eye Grill in New York on October 26, 2017. Photo by Lia Chang

Inside the Opening Night Party of the Broadway Revival of David Henry Hwang’s M. BUTTERFLY with Clive Owen, Jin Ha and More

Speaker Bios

David Henry Hwang
David Henry Hwang’s work includes the plays M. ButterflyChinglishYellow FaceKung FuGolden ChildThe Dance and the Railroad, and FOB, and the Broadway musicals Aida (co-author), Flower Drum Song (2002 revival) and Disney’s Tarzan. He is America’s most-produced living opera librettist, who has worked with composers Philip Glass, Osvaldo Golijov, and Bright Sheng, among others. Hwang is a Tony© Award winner and three-time nominee, a three-time Obie Award winner and a two-time Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. He is currently a writer/producer for the Golden Globe-winning television series The Affair. Hwang won the 2011 PEN/Laura Pels, the 2012 Inge, the 2012 Steinberg “Mimi”, a 2014 Doris Duke Artist, and the 2015 IPSA Distinguished Artist Awards. He heads the MFA playwriting program at Columbia University School of the Arts, and was recently the Residency One Playwright at New York’s Signature Theatre. From 1994-2000, he sat by appointment of President Bill Clinton on the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities. David Henry Hwang serves on the Board of the Lark Play Development Center and was recently elected Chair of the American Theatre Wing.

Julie Taymor
As a Tony®, Emmy®, and Grammy® winning and Oscar® nominated filmmaker, Julie Taymor has changed the face of Broadway with her innovative direction.

Her Broadway adaptation of The Lion King debuted in 1997. An instant sensation, it received 11 Tony® Award nominations, with Julie receiving awards for Best Director and Costume Designer. She was the first woman in theatrical history to receive the award for Best Direction of a Musical. In addition to her Tony® Awards, she also received awards for her puppet, costume, and mask designs. The Lion King has gone on to become the most successful stage musical of all time; 24 global productions have been seen by more than 90 million people. The show has played over 100 cities in 19 countries, and it’s worldwide gross exceeds that of any entertainment title in box office history.

Her credits also include the play Grounded, starring Anne Hathaway, at the Public Theater and a cinematic version of William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, filmed during her critically acclaimed, sold-out stage production at Theatre for a New Audience in Brooklyn. Also, Broadway’s Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark; The Green Bird; and Juan Darien: A Carnival Mass, which earned five Tony Award nominations including one for her direction. Operas include Oedipus Rex, with Jessye Norman; The Flying DutchmanSalomeDie Zauberflote (in repertory at the Met); The Magic Flute (the abridged English version, which inaugurated a PBS series entitled “Great Performances at the Met”); and Elliot Goldenthal’s Grendel. Film credits include Titus, starring Anthony Hopkins and Jessica Lange; Frida starring Salma Hayek; Across the Universe; and The Tempest, starring Helen Mirren. Taymor is a recipient of the 1991 MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship, as well as a 2015 inductee into the Theater Hall of Fame for Lifetime Achievement in the American Theater, the recipient of the 2015 Shakespeare Theatre Company’s William Shakespeare Award for Classical Theatre, and a 2017 Disney Legends Award honoree. She is currently directing M BUTTERFLY starring Clive Owen on Broadway.

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M. BUTTERFLY Back on Broadway: A Conversation with David Henry Hwang and Julie Taymor at Asia Society on November 3

(l) Julie Taymor, photo by Marco Grob (r) David Henry Hwang, photo by Gregory Costanzo
 (l) Julie Taymor, photo by Marco Grob (r) David Henry Hwang, photo by Gregory Costanzo
(l) Julie Taymor, photo by Marco Grob (r) David Henry Hwang, photo by Gregory Costanzo

On Friday, November 3, 2017, Asia Society is presenting A Conversation with Tony Award-winning playwright David Henry Hwang and director Julie Taymor at Asia Society, 725 Park Avenue, New York, NY from 6:30pm – 8:00pm. $20 members; $22 students/seniors; $25 nonmembers BUY TICKETS »

Hwang’s The revival of Hwang’s Tony Award-winning play M. Butterfly  is currently in previews at the Cort Theatre starring Academy Award nominee Clive Owen and directed by the visionary Julie Taymor (The Lion King). Based on real-life scandal, M. Butterfly delves into a world of love, espionage, and deception. David Henry Hwang and Julie Taymor come together to discuss their artistic collaboration and the new vision they have developed in recognition of the wider issues that make the production contemporary, nearly 30 years after its original Broadway debut in 1988.

Speaker Bios

David Henry Hwang
David Henry Hwang’s work includes the plays M. ButterflyChinglishYellow FaceKung FuGolden ChildThe Dance and the Railroad, and FOB, and the Broadway musicals Aida (co-author), Flower Drum Song (2002 revival) and Disney’s Tarzan. He is America’s most-produced living opera librettist, who has worked with composers Philip Glass, Osvaldo Golijov, and Bright Sheng, among others. Hwang is a Tony© Award winner and three-time nominee, a three-time Obie Award winner and a two-time Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. He is currently a writer/producer for the Golden Globe-winning television series The Affair. Hwang won the 2011 PEN/Laura Pels, the 2012 Inge, the 2012 Steinberg “Mimi”, a 2014 Doris Duke Artist, and the 2015 IPSA Distinguished Artist Awards. He heads the MFA playwriting program at Columbia University School of the Arts, and was recently the Residency One Playwright at New York’s Signature Theatre. From 1994-2000, he sat by appointment of President Bill Clinton on the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities. David Henry Hwang serves on the Board of the Lark Play Development Center and was recently elected Chair of the American Theatre Wing.

Julie Taymor
As a Tony®, Emmy®, and Grammy® winning and Oscar® nominated filmmaker, Julie Taymor has changed the face of Broadway with her innovative direction.

Her Broadway adaptation of The Lion King debuted in 1997. An instant sensation, it received 11 Tony® Award nominations, with Julie receiving awards for Best Director and Costume Designer. She was the first woman in theatrical history to receive the award for Best Direction of a Musical. In addition to her Tony® Awards, she also received awards for her puppet, costume, and mask designs. The Lion King has gone on to become the most successful stage musical of all time; 24 global productions have been seen by more than 90 million people. The show has played over 100 cities in 19 countries, and it’s worldwide gross exceeds that of any entertainment title in box office history.

Her credits also include the play Grounded, starring Anne Hathaway, at the Public Theater and a cinematic version of William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, filmed during her critically acclaimed, sold-out stage production at Theatre for a New Audience in Brooklyn. Also, Broadway’s Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark; The Green Bird; and Juan Darien: A Carnival Mass, which earned five Tony Award nominations including one for her direction. Operas include Oedipus Rex, with Jessye Norman; The Flying DutchmanSalomeDie Zauberflote (in repertory at the Met); The Magic Flute (the abridged English version, which inaugurated a PBS series entitled “Great Performances at the Met”); and Elliot Goldenthal’s Grendel. Film credits include Titus, starring Anthony Hopkins and Jessica Lange; Frida starring Salma Hayek; Across the Universe; and The Tempest, starring Helen Mirren. Taymor is a recipient of the 1991 MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship, as well as a 2015 inductee into the Theater Hall of Fame for Lifetime Achievement in the American Theater, the recipient of the 2015 Shakespeare Theatre Company’s William Shakespeare Award for Classical Theatre, and a 2017 Disney Legends Award honoree. She is currently directing M BUTTERFLY starring Clive Owen on Broadway.

Clive Owen and Jin Ha Star in Broadway Revival of David Henry Hwang’s M. BUTTERFLY, Opens October 26 

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Princess Iron Fan: The Stories and Music of Cantonese Opera with Joanna C. Lee and Patrick P. Lee at MOCA on August 12

Makeup application backstage, ca.1950's, MOCA Collections.

On Saturday, August 12th, join Hong Kong experts Joanna C. Lee and Patrick P. Lee at the Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) for Princess Iron Fan: The Stories and Music of Cantonese Opera from 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm. Tickets (include museum admission: $12/adult; $8/student & senior; Free for MOCA members. Click here to purchase tickets.

Before Hong Kong films, the most exported entertainment from southern China was Cantonese opera. Older than Peking opera, yet more open to innovation, Cantonese opera thrived not only in its home region but also in Cantonese enclaves around the world, with major stars from Hong Kong and Guangzhou (historically, Canton) regularly reaching out to their international fan base. Today, Cantonese opera still packs in the audiences in southern China, with professional troupes bolstered by an active community of amateur devotees.

Makeup application backstage, ca.1950's, MOCA Collections.
Makeup application backstage, ca.1950’s, MOCA Collections.

This session offers an introduction to Cantonese opera’s traditional stories and musical styles. Learn the difference between a role type and a tune type, between Princess Changping and Princess Iron Fan. Two of Hong Kong’s noted experts guide you through this stylized yet populist entertainment.

Patrick P. Lee is the Hong Kong-based author of two books on Cantonese musical vernacular and a third, An Introduction to Cantonese Opera Music, scheduled for release this fall. A third-generation member of a Macau literati family, he pursued university and postgraduate studies in Hong Kong in art, literature and education. Since retiring from a four-decade career in education policy, he has devoted his attention to Cantonese opera. He has performed three solo recitals at the Hong Kong Cultural Centre and toured extensively in Guangzhou, Macau and Shenzhen, with periodic stage appearances in the United States, Canada and Australia. In 2010 he made his concert debut in Amsterdam with musicians from the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra.

Joanna C. Lee received degrees in piano performance from London’s Royal College of Music and musicology from New York’s Columbia University. Later joining the music faculty at the University of Hong Kong, she received a 12-month grant to document an oral history of amateur Cantonese opera singing in Hong Kong and the American and Canadian diaspora. A longtime Honorary Research Fellow for HKU’s Centre of Asian Studies (2003-11), she is also an active translator and advisor for a broad range of cultural organizations.

Click here for the Lia Chang Articles Archive and here for the Lia Chang Photography Website.

Lia Chang, Photo by Garth Kravits
Lia Chang, Photo by Garth Kravits

Lia Chang is an award-winning filmmaker, a Best Actress nominee, a photographer, and an award-winning multi-platform journalist. Lia has appeared in the films Wolf, New Jack City, A Kiss Before Dying, King of New York, Big Trouble in Little China, The Last Dragon, Taxman and Hide and Seek. She is profiled in  Jade Magazine and Playbill.com.

All text, graphics, articles & photographs: © 2000-2017 Lia Chang Multimedia. All rights reserved. All materials contained on this site are protected by United States copyright law and may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, displayed, published or broadcast without the prior written permission of Lia Chang. You may not alter or remove any trademark, copyright or other notice from copies of the content. For permission, please contact Lia at lia@liachang.com

“Instructions to All Persons: Reflections on Executive Order 9066” Exhibition at JANM on view February 18 – August 13

From February 18 to August 13, 2017, the Japanese American National Museum will present Instructions to All Persons: Reflections on Executive Order 9066, a new exhibition that commemorates the 75th anniversary of President Franklin Roosevelt’s signing of Executive Order 9066, which led to the tragic and unlawful incarceration of 120,000 individuals of Japanese ancestry during World War II. For the first three months of the exhibition, original documents from the National Archives never before displayed in the Western United States will be the centerpiece of the exhibition. Instructions to All Persons is funded by The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation.

Japanese Americans wait at the old Santa Fe Station, Los Angeles, California. They are bound for Parker, Arizona (Poston concentration camp), May 29, 1942. Gift of Susan K. Mochizuki and Ann K. Uyeda.
Japanese Americans wait at the old Santa Fe Station, Los Angeles, California. They are bound for Parker, Arizona (Poston concentration camp), May 29, 1942. Gift of Susan K. Mochizuki and Ann K. Uyeda.

President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 on February 19, 1942, just a little more than two months after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Shortly after, a series of Civilian Exclusion Orders were publicly posted all along the West Coast of the United States, notifying persons of Japanese ancestry of their impending forced removal. “Instructions to All Persons of Japanese Ancestry” were the infamous words seen at the top of the posters. Historic examples of these documents and others of the period, along with documentary videos, will form the substance of the exhibition. Contemporary artworks by Wendy Maruyama and Mike Saijo will be featured as well.

War Relocation Authority photo, taken at the Jerome concentration camp in Arkansas, June 18, 1944. Gift of Dr. Toshio Yatsuhiro and Lily Koyama.
War Relocation Authority photo, taken at the Jerome concentration camp in Arkansas, June 18, 1944. Gift of Dr. Toshio Yatsuhiro and Lily Koyama.

Through May 21, the original Executive Order 9066, including the page bearing Roosevelt’s signature, will be on loan from the National Archives. In addition, Presidential Proclamation 2537, a key precursor to Executive Order 9066 that required individuals from the enemy countries of Germany, Italy, and Japan to register with the United States Department of Justice, will be displayed, also on loan from the National Archives. After May 21, replicas will be on display for the duration of the exhibition. Executive Order 9066 was most recently displayed in Washington, DC, in 2013; prior to that it was on view at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History in 1987 and 1988.

Page one of Executive Order 9066. National Archives, Washington, DC.
Page one of Executive Order 9066. National Archives, Washington, DC.

Instructions to All Persons is intended to engage visitors in critical discussions of the Japanese American incarceration experience and its continuing relevance today. It aims to examine the social impact of language and encourage viewers to contemplate the lessons of the past, as well as to compare World War II experiences with current events.

Instructions to All Persons is an important exhibition that looks back at pivotal actions by the American government that led to tragic outcomes for Japanese Americans during World War II, while at the same time demonstrating how the lessons of that shameful chapter of history are powerfully meaningful in our world today and how without vigilance that grave injustice could happen again,” said Ann Burroughs, Interim President and CEO of the Japanese American National Museum. “This is an exhibition that everyone who cares about civil rights, democracy, and justice needs to see.”

“This historic anniversary is an opportunity to remember the unconscionable indignity our country imposed on Americans because of the color of their skin and their ancestry, and it is an important reminder to all of us that we must never repeat these injustices,” said Eli Broad, founder of The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation. “These original documents are critical to share with a generation that has only learned of the Japanese American incarceration through history books. We are pleased to support this exhibition and hope this is the catalyst for an important dialogue, especially with young people, about human rights and dignity.”

“We are pleased to partner with the Japanese American National Museum to bring these historic documents to Los Angeles, where their history and social impact was so deeply experienced, and to this museum, on the very spot where Japanese Americans’ belongings were stored when they were interned,” said Archivist of the United States David S. Ferriero. “These are two of the hundreds of thousands of documents held by the National Archives relating to Japanese American internment—from the original Executive Order 9066, to camp photos by Dorothea Lange, to records of interned individuals and families, to the 1988 Civil Liberties Act, in which the government admitted a wrong, and acted to compensate those who suffered from this unjust order.”

In addition to the two- and three-dimensional artifacts and artworks, the museum has partnered with East West Players, the nation’s premier Asian American theatre, for a limited number of special performances that will take place in the Instructions galleries. Each performance will be made up of three vignettes that use Japanese American, Muslim American, and Native American stories to explore civil rights and threats to those rights. Performances are slated for March 4, April 1, and April 8, all at 12:30 p.m. Performances are included with museum admission. No RSVP is necessary. Space is limited and will be available on a first come, first served basis.

Beginning March 24, the museum will additionally offer Moving Day, a public art piece in which reproductions of approximately 80 exclusion orders will be projected on the exterior of JANM’s historic building located at 369 E. 1st Street, from sundown to midnight. Projections will coincide with the date of the orders’ issuance. The historic building, located across the plaza from JANM’s current Pavilion building, was itself a designated reporting location for Japanese Americans in 1942; many were able to store their belongings in the building during their incarceration. Little Tokyo Service Center is a community partner and supporter of Moving Day.

For more information about Instructions to All Persons: Reflections on Executive Order 9066, visit janm.org/instructions-to-all.

Special Display—Only the Oaks Remain: The Story of Tuna Canyon Detention Station
Through April 9, 2017
This special display tells the true stories of those targeted as dangerous enemy aliens and imprisoned in the Tuna Canyon Detention Station, located in the Tujunga neighborhood of Los Angeles, by the US Department of Justice during World War II. Photographs, letters, and diaries bring the experiences of imprisoned Japanese, German, and Italian immigrants and Japanese Peruvians to life. This project was organized by the Tuna Canyon Detention Station Coalition; funded, in part, by a grant from the US Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Japanese American Confinement Sites Grant Program; and sponsored by the San Fernando Valley Japanese American Community Center.

Common Ground: The Heart of Community
Ongoing
Incorporating hundreds of objects, documents, and photographs collected by JANM, this exhibition chronicles 130 years of Japanese American history, from the early days of the Issei pioneers through the World War II incarceration to the present.

About the Japanese American National Museum (JANM)

Established in 1985, the Japanese American National Museum promotes understanding and appreciation of America’s ethnic and cultural diversity by sharing the Japanese American experience. Located in the historic Little Tokyo district of downtown Los Angeles, JANM is a hybrid institution that straddles traditional museum categories and strives to provide a voice for Japanese Americans as well as a forum that enables all people to explore their own heritage and culture. Since opening to the public, JANM has presented over 70 exhibitions onsite and traveled 17 of its exhibitions to locations around the world, including the Smithsonian Institution and the Ellis Island Museum in the United States, and several leading cultural museums in Japan and South America.

JANM is located at 100 N. Central Ave., Los Angeles. Museum hours are Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Thursday from noon to 8 p.m. General admission is $10 adults, $6 students and seniors, free for members and children under age five. Admission is free to everyone on Thursdays from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. and every third Thursday of the month from noon to 8 p.m. General admission prices and free admission times may not apply to specially ticketed exhibitions. Closed Monday, 4th of July, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day. For more information visit janm.org or call 213.625.0414.

The Broad Foundations, which include The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation and The Broad Art Foundation, were established to advance entrepreneurship for the public good in education, science and the arts. For more information, visit www.broadfoundation.org.

The National Archives is an independent Federal agency that serves American democracy by safeguarding and preserving the records of our Government, so people can discover, use, and learn from this documentary heritage. The National Archives ensures continuing access to the essential documentation of the rights of American citizens and the actions of their government. From the Declaration of Independence to accounts of ordinary Americans, the holdings of the National Archives directly touch the lives of millions of people. The agency supports democracy, promotes civic education, and facilitates historical understanding of our national experience. The National Archives carries out its mission through a nationwide network of archives, records centers, and Presidential Libraries, and online at www.archives.gov.

Lunar New Year Festival at The Met with Alan Muraoka and Sesame Street Puppeteers Pam Arciero and Jennifer Barnhart

Jennifer Barnhart, Alan Muraoka and Pam Arciero at The Met's Lunar New Year Festival: Year of the Rooster. Photo by Lia Chang

On Sunday afternoon, The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium at The Metropolitan Museum of Art was filled to the rafters with eager children and their parents waiting to kick off their Year of the Rooster celebration with Alan Muraoka and Sesame Street Puppeteers Jennifer Barnhart and Pam Arciero.

Pam Arciero, Alan Muraoka and Jennifer Barnhart at The Met's Lunar New Year Festival: Year of the Rooster. Photo by Lia Chang
Pam Arciero, Alan Muraoka and Jennifer Barnhart at The Met’s Lunar New Year Festival: Year of the Rooster. Photo by Lia Chang

The day long Lunar New Year Festival: Year of the Rooster featured dozens of programs—for visitors of all ages—that reflected traditions from across Asia.

Pam Arciero, Alan Muraoka and Jennifer Barnhart at The Met's Lunar New Year: Year of the Rooster Festival. Photo by Lia Chang
Pam Arciero, Alan Muraoka and Jennifer Barnhart at The Met’s Lunar New Year: Year of the Rooster Festival. Photo by Lia Chang

Alan Muraoka, most recognizable for his role in the Emmy-winning series, Sesame Street, where he has played Alan, the proprietor of Hooper’s Store, for 18 seasons, recently returned to the Great White Way for a limited run last fall to star as Iago in Disney’s Aladdin at the New Amsterdam Theatre.

SESAME STREET’s Alan Muraoka Stars as Iago in Broadway’s ALADDIN 

Prior to Aladdin, Mr. Muraoka appeared in six Broadway shows: the Roundabout Theatre revival of Pacific Overtures, The King and I, My Favorite Year, Shogun, the Musical, Mail, and most notably Miss Saigon, where he played the lead role of the Engineer. He is featured in the films, It Could Happen to You, and Day of Independence. Other television credits include Curb Your Enthusiasm, Louie, 30 Rock, Brotherhood, Late Night With David Letterman, and The Tonight Show, as well as numerous commercials.

Jennifer Barnhart, Alan Muraoka and Pam Arciero at The Met's Lunar New Year Festival: Year of the Rooster. Photo by Lia Chang
Jennifer Barnhart, Alan Muraoka and Pam Arciero at The Met’s Lunar New Year Festival: Year of the Rooster. Photo by Lia Chang

After the performance, the children created art to add to the Collaborative Rooster in the Carson Family Hall, Ruth and Harold D. Uris Center for Education.

Lunar New Year Festival: Year of the Rooster at The Met on February 5, 2017. Photo by Lia Chang
Lunar New Year Festival: Year of the Rooster at The Met on February 5, 2017. Photo by Lia Chang

Alan Muraoka and Sesame Street puppeteers Pam Arciero and Jennifer Barnhart took pictures with their fans of all ages.

SESAME STREET’s Alan Muraoka Stars as Iago in Broadway’s ALADDIN 
Alan Muraoka talks navigating The Fringe Festival at the helm of Martin Casella’s critically-acclaimed THE REPORT
Times Square Chronicles: Fringe Festival: Calling All Producers The Report is the Play to See
nytheaternow.com:THE REPORT
StageBuddy.com: FringeNYC Review: The Report
Broadwayworld.com: Photo Flash: First Look at THE REPORT as Part of FringeNYC

Click here for the Lia Chang Articles Archive and here for the Lia Chang Photography Website.

Lia Chang. Photo by Garth Kravits
Lia Chang. Photo by Garth Kravits

Lia Chang is an actor, a multi-media content producer and co-founder of Bev’s Girl Films, making films that foster inclusion and diversity on both sides of the camera. Bev’s Girl Films’ debut short film, Hide and Seek was a top ten film in the Asian American Film Lab’s 2015 72 Hour Shootout Filmmaking Competition, and she received a Best Actress nomination. BGF collaborates with and produces multi-media content for artists, actors, designers, theatrical productions, composers,  musicians and corporations. Lia is also an internationally published and exhibited photographer, a multi-platform journalist, and a publicist. Lia has appeared in the films Wolf, New Jack City, A Kiss Before Dying, King of New York, Big Trouble in Little China, The Last Dragon, Taxman and Hide and Seek. She is profiled in Jade Magazine and Playbill.com.